Matjaz Vidmar

Oct 212020
 

Traverse Theatre, 10 Cambridge St, Edinburgh EH1 2ED

Annie is an Edinburgh-based writer, theatremaker and occasional filmmaker, who was born in Kerala India, and has worked in Scottish theatre since 1991. She was awarded the Ignite Fellowship 2019 (Scottish Book Trust) and the 2016 Inspiring Scotland Bursary.

Recent productions include ‘Twa’, a collaboration with visual artist Flore Gardner, and the solo shows ‘Home is Not the Place’ and ‘The Bridge’. She has worked with numerous artists and organisations including Magnetic North, Mara Menzies and Stellar Quines, and was Actor/Producer in the late ‘90s, with Fringe-First winning CAT. A. Theatre Company

Annie George

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://anniegeorge.net

Share #curiousedinburgh:
Oct 212020
 

Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, Edinburgh EH1 2EA

The musical lyrics of various Black and Asian Scottish artists speak to their lived experience of living in Scotland, including Eliza Shaddad, Emeli Sande, Helicopter Girl, Soom T and Young Fathers.

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/

Share #curiousedinburgh:
Oct 212020
 

Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, Edinburgh EH1 2EA

Abigail Mills aka Abz, is a queer Scottish-Jamaican tattoo and graffiti artist from Kirkcaldy. Abz has been an artist since childhood, always able to visualise and create ideas… Having been tattooing for over 9 years, Abz works in Glasgow, Dunfermline and Kirkcaldy in a bright, colourful and thought-provoking style.

Abz work on the Usher Hall Glass wing calls for justice to Sheku Bayouh and her artwork on Lothian Road sits as a provocation to Scotland as a nation.

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://www.instagram.com/abzmillstattoos/

Share #curiousedinburgh:
Oct 212020
 

The Royal Lyceum Theatre, 30b Grindlay St, Edinburgh EH3 9AX

These three complementary pieces are portraits of the artist’s grandmother and great aunts. All of which taught him the value of hard work and perseverance by achieving great success in various professional fields. They are some of the most successful people in the family and they are black women – one of, if not the single most overlooked and underrated demographic in modern society.

A midwife, a school teacher and a nurse. They nurtured, taught and healed others even when the world didn’t do the same for them. Never losing their pride, their poise or their power. Their lives don’t just matter. They’re essential. Here, they are celebrated. The pieces have been purposely made to look like distressed pop-art. Idols in makeshift, political iconology. An acknowledgement of the past as we look toward the future. Red for the sacrifices of our ancestors. Yellow for the wealth of knowledge and empowerment passed down to us. Green for the motherland and our hopes for it and our people’s future.

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://www.instagram.com/theneonrequiem/

Share #curiousedinburgh:
Oct 212020
 

The Hub, Castlehill, Edinburgh, EH1 2NE

This series of photographs was taken by photographer Jamal Yussuff-Adelakun, a British born Nigerian now based in Edinburgh. His daughter Lola was the model and he says:

I always promised myself that when I had children, I would speak to them about their culture and heritage (including other cultures) and the reality of life, from birth; the things I know they won’t be taught in school. The day the news about George Floyd broke, I spoke to my daughter briefly about it. She understood the importance of what I just told her and we felt compelled to create our own response.

The results are what you see, and much of the concept came from her, focusing on the poignancy of “I can’t breathe”.

Jamal and Lola Yussuff-Adelakun

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://www.facebook.com/papajgunphotography/

Share #curiousedinburgh:
Oct 202020
 

The Queens Hall, Clerk St, Newington, Edinburgh EH8 9JG

The problem of police brutality in Black and Brown communities has become a very frustrating issue. Part of the reason for exasperation lies with the fact that we are divided as a country when it comes to the notion of responsible policing. This became apparent when the “Black Lives Matter” movement was quickly met by obstinate supporters of police officers, rebelliously retorting chants of “All Lives Matter” and “Blue Lives Matter.”

Playing with the misleading statement “all lives matter” I would like to take off one letter changing the statement to “all li es matter” which I find simple but strong.

Rudy Kanhye is a French Artist, curator and writer. Masters graduate of Glasgow School of Art, Rudy developed his practice around the dialogue between cultures, people, past, present and what the future could be. Working primarily with themes related to identity, history, and popular culture. His work focuses on framing and context.

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://www.instagram.com/rudykanhye

Share #curiousedinburgh:
Aug 102020
 

High School Yards, Edinburgh EH1 1LZ

surgeon's square
High School Yards with Old Surgeon’s Hall.

The four buildings inside High School Yards have a long history of medicine and surgery within Edinburgh. Old Surgeons’ Hall (OSH), built in 1697 by Scottish architect James Smith, was designed as an anatomy theatre and the first public dissection occurred in 1703. By 1832, the surgeons moved to New Surgeons’ Hall on Nicolson Street and OSH and the New High School building (where the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation is currently located) were converted to surgical hospitals. The current School of Geoscience was built in 1853 as a surgical hospital. Known as Drummond Street Surgical Hospital, it was built as part of the Royal Infirmary. When the Royal Infirmary moved to Lauriston Place in 1879, the already established surgical hospitals and Chisholm House were converted into medical facilities for contagious patients. Under the control of Sir Henry Littlejohn, Edinburgh’s Medical Officer, this group of buildings became known as the City Fever Hospital. In 1903 the City Fever Hospital moved to a new location on Coliston Mains and the buildings at HSY were sold to the University of Edinburgh.

Postcard of a painting by J Sanderson of the old Royal Infirmary Edinburgh building at Infirmary Street.
An etching (published in 1829) of Old Surgeon’s Hall and adjacent buildings.
Perspective View of the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh at Infirmary Street.

Share #curiousedinburgh:
Aug 102020
 

45 Lauriston Place/2a Chalmers Street, EH3 9HQ

Chalmers Hospital in the 1960s.

In 1836, George Chalmers, a plumber and burgess of Edinburgh, passed away, leaving the residue of his estate “for the express purpose of founding a New Infirmary or Sick and Hurt Hospital, or by whatever name it may be Designed.” Unfortunately, Chalmers did not leave enough funds to build a hospital, so the total value of his estate was invested in government stock. By 1860 the stocks had increased in value enough to pay for the conversion of Lauriston House into a hospital. Architect J. Dick Peddle designed the hospital to have four separate wards with 48 beds. The first two of these wards opened in February 1864 for free patient care, and in 1872 the second two wards were opened for paying patients. In 1939 the hospital was requisitioned by the government for the care of civilian casualties during WWII. Chalmers Hospital became part of the NHS in 1948 and with it turned its two private patient wards into wards for free hospital care. In 2009 the hospital was redesigned, incorporating the original building with a glass annexe to accommodate a sexual health centre.

Designs for the extension to the Chalmers Hospital.
Share #curiousedinburgh:
Aug 102020
 

64 Canongate, EH8 8BS

Queensberry House (2010, CC-SA by Kim Traynor)

Queensberry House is currently part of the Scottish Parliament buildings and contains the office for the Presiding Officer of the Scottish Parliament. From 1803 until 1996, however, the house was used as a hospital. In 1801, Queensberry House, previously a private residence, was repossessed by the government and used as an emergency hospital. The house then acted as an army base from 1808-1815, with a third storey was added to the house to accommodate army barracks and the pavilions converted into marching areas. The house returned to its use as emergency public hospital between 1815-1833, caring for homeless patients. In 1833, Queensberry House officially became a House of Refuge for the homeless population of Edinburgh. It remained one until the foundation of the NHS in 1948, at which point it became a specialised care facility for the elderly as Queensberry House Hospital. The hospital closed in 1996 and the site was purchased by the Scottish Parliament in 1997 where it became integrated with the Holyrood building.

Share #curiousedinburgh: