Oct 212020
 

Edinburgh Playhouse, 18-22 Greenside Pl, Edinburgh EH1 3AA

Tony Brown Kalisa is an 18-year-old self-taught graphic artist, born in Uganda he has called Edinburgh his home for 4 years. His style utilities a variety of images and techniques to build a design made up of many layers. Tony’s creative practice is continually inspired by his mother who raised him as a single parent with African values in a western context.

His artwork was inspired by the various protest that happened across the world in response to the killing of George Floyd and in support of Black Lives Matter and the fact that this show of solidarity was lead by young people of all races.

Tony Kalisa with his mum.

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://tayo-adekunle.format.com/collages

Oct 212020
 

North Edinburgh Arts, 15a Pennywell Rd, Edinburgh EH4 4TZ

Farah is an Edinburgh artist who works in watercolour, acrylic, pastel, collage and charcoal. As a disabled woman of South East Asian heritage, Farah has lived experience of racism and discrimination which is often reflected in her work. In 2019 her work featured in the Out of Sight, Out of Mind exhibition at Summerhall.

Farah Nazley

Her artwork calls for an end to racism. Full Stop!

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/

Rosa assisting the artist.
Oct 212020
 

Jupiter Artland, Bonnington House The Steadings, Wilkieston, Edinburgh EH27 8BY

Saoirse’s creative process is inspired by her fascination with interconnectedness and movement in both everyday life, and her cultural heritage. She considers the potential that lies in caring for ourselves and others and the extent to which this nurturing can benefit us both personally and politically.

“We Can Still Dance references the negative impact of Hollywood’s Magical Negro trope on myself and many others. This trope enforces the stereotype that Black people merely exist to nurture and support our white counterparts. I want to flip this stereotype to reinforce Audre Lorde’s idea that caring for ourselves as Black womxn is an act of political warfare and allows us to define our own destiny. We may project our light onto the world, but first, we must shine for ourselves.

Personally, I feel this self-nourishment while dancing. If ever I am confronted by fear, I try to remember that Audre told me “I can still dance”, and the fear turns itself into fire.

Saoirse Amira Anis

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://www.saoirse-anis.com/

Oct 212020
 

The Hub, Castlehill, Edinburgh, EH1 2NE

This series of photographs was taken by photographer Jamal Yussuff-Adelakun, a British born Nigerian now based in Edinburgh. His daughter Lola was the model and he says:

I always promised myself that when I had children, I would speak to them about their culture and heritage (including other cultures) and the reality of life, from birth; the things I know they won’t be taught in school. The day the news about George Floyd broke, I spoke to my daughter briefly about it. She understood the importance of what I just told her and we felt compelled to create our own response.

The results are what you see, and much of the concept came from her, focusing on the poignancy of “I can’t breathe”.

Jamal and Lola Yussuff-Adelakun

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://www.facebook.com/papajgunphotography/

Oct 212020
 

The Royal Lyceum Theatre, 30b Grindlay St, Edinburgh EH3 9AX

These three complementary pieces are portraits of the artist’s grandmother and great aunts. All of which taught him the value of hard work and perseverance by achieving great success in various professional fields. They are some of the most successful people in the family and they are black women – one of, if not the single most overlooked and underrated demographic in modern society.

A midwife, a school teacher and a nurse. They nurtured, taught and healed others even when the world didn’t do the same for them. Never losing their pride, their poise or their power. Their lives don’t just matter. They’re essential. Here, they are celebrated. The pieces have been purposely made to look like distressed pop-art. Idols in makeshift, political iconology. An acknowledgement of the past as we look toward the future. Red for the sacrifices of our ancestors. Yellow for the wealth of knowledge and empowerment passed down to us. Green for the motherland and our hopes for it and our people’s future.

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://www.instagram.com/theneonrequiem/

Oct 212020
 

Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, Edinburgh EH1 2EA

Abigail Mills aka Abz, is a queer Scottish-Jamaican tattoo and graffiti artist from Kirkcaldy. Abz has been an artist since childhood, always able to visualise and create ideas… Having been tattooing for over 9 years, Abz works in Glasgow, Dunfermline and Kirkcaldy in a bright, colourful and thought-provoking style.

Abz work on the Usher Hall Glass wing calls for justice to Sheku Bayouh and her artwork on Lothian Road sits as a provocation to Scotland as a nation.

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://www.instagram.com/abzmillstattoos/

Oct 202020
 

The Queens Hall, Clerk St, Newington, Edinburgh EH8 9JG

The problem of police brutality in Black and Brown communities has become a very frustrating issue. Part of the reason for exasperation lies with the fact that we are divided as a country when it comes to the notion of responsible policing. This became apparent when the “Black Lives Matter” movement was quickly met by obstinate supporters of police officers, rebelliously retorting chants of “All Lives Matter” and “Blue Lives Matter.”

Playing with the misleading statement “all lives matter” I would like to take off one letter changing the statement to “all li es matter” which I find simple but strong.

Rudy Kanhye is a French Artist, curator and writer. Masters graduate of Glasgow School of Art, Rudy developed his practice around the dialogue between cultures, people, past, present and what the future could be. Working primarily with themes related to identity, history, and popular culture. His work focuses on framing and context.

https://www.wezi.uk/mural-trail-locations/
https://www.instagram.com/blmmuraltrail/
https://www.instagram.com/rudykanhye